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Found 28 results

  1. Filipinos have a penchant for singing and dancing, hence the education-entertainment approach was used in communicating key themes on immunization. The Department of Health in the Philippines, with support from the World Health Organization, produced the following music videos for the Back to Bakuna (Back to Vaccines) campaign in 2017: Bakwagon (a word play on Bakuna/Vaccine and wagon), a public service announcement aired on TV and radio Baby Come Bak (Baby Come Back), on convincing parents and caregivers to complete their baby's vaccination Limang Bisita (Five Visits), on the schedule of immunization visits May Bakuna para D'yan (There's a Vacccine for That), on vaccines and diseases they prevent Okay Kay Baby (Okay for Baby), on vaccine safety. This music video is not included in the playlist but is exclusively played at health facilities. The music videos are being played at waiting areas of health centers, to supplement the information needs of parents and caregivers while they wait for their child to be vaccinated.
  2. Find information about vaccines for different age groups and learn about free resources such as a free mobile app, online trivia game, and monthly newsletter for parents.
  3. This course aims to establish a shared understanding among professionals whose work is linked to vaccine safety issues. This may include nurses/midwives/community health workers, as well as pharmacists medical doctors and programme or technical officers.
  4. Find out about the history of this concern and the findings of studies looking at whether vaccines cause autism.
  5. Our mission is to provide an independent assessment of vaccines and vaccine safety to help guide decision makers and educate physicians, the public and the media about key issues surrounding the safety of vaccines. The institute’s goal is to work toward preventing disease using the safest vaccines possible.
  6. In this short video, Dr. Paul Offit, Director of the Vaccine Education Center at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, discusses HPV vaccine and concerns about the vaccine's safety, particularly related to chronic diseases.
  7. In this short video, Dr. Paul Offit, Director of the Vaccine Education Center at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia discusses the difference between aluminum that is injected versus ingested.
  8. In this short video, Dr. Paul Offit, Director of the Vaccine Education Center at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, discusses why aluminum is in vaccines and why we know it is safe in the quantities in vaccines.
  9. In this short video, Dr. Paul Offit discusses why the current vaccine schedule does not overwhelm a baby's immune system.
  10. One of history's greatest scientists, yet most do not know his name. Dr. Maurice Hilleman helped to create many vaccines over a lifetime of dedication to science. Find out more about Dr. Hilleman, his life and accomplishments, and a documentary film about his life's goal of protecting children from every infectious disease that could harm them.
  11. The Vaccine Education Center at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia provides complete, up-to-date and reliable information about vaccines to parents and healthcare professionals.
  12. This is a short video, explaining herd immunity. It has been viewed 100,000 times.
  13. Flu can make you feel rubbish, but for some people it can be deadly. There is a vaccine against it, but how effective is it at protecting us against the virus? BBC reporter gives a brief overview of how the flu vaccine is devised and the decisions that have to be made a year in advance.
  14. A fantastic website with lots of information about vaccines, vaccine safety and vaccine communication. Targeted audience includes general public as well as healthcare professionals. Several sections are very interesting and informative.
  15. As more and more parents are choosing not to vaccinate their children or are vaccinating them later, diseases like measles are making a comeback. Are vaccines safe? How do vaccines work? Why do some people claim there is a link between vaccines and autism? This video looks at why are people afraid of something that has saved so many lives, and look at the history and science of vaccines.
  16. WHO's global page on vaccine safety with links to: Global Vaccine Safety Global Vaccine Safety Initiative Detection Investigation Communication Tools and methods Regulatory framework Technical support and trainings Global analysis and response Public-private information exchange Global Advisory Committee on Vaccine Safety Reference documents and publications In 2011, WHO and a group of partners developed a strategic document on vaccine safety called the Global Vaccine Safety Blueprint. This document sets out indicators that aim to ensure that all countries have at least a minimal capacity to ensure vaccine safety. The Blueprint proposes a strategic plan for strengthening vaccine safety activities globally. It focuses on building national capacity for vaccine safety in the world’s poorest countries through the coordinated efforts of major stakeholders.
  17. This page explains the importance of making an informed decision and advices different places to go to gather balanced and science-based information about immunization
  18. This page deals with the challenge for many physicians against vaccine hesitancy and refusal among families. Case studies based in real-life scenarios are provided to help physicians to demonstrate effective vaccine safety communication. Trainees are asked a series of questions and provided with immediate feedback for their responses
  19. The articles in this section analyze and give evidence based answers to the main theories of anti-vaccination movements in order to shatter false myths and urban legends.
  20. A fact sheet helping people decide if vaccine information is accurate; published on April 2017. There are 10 points that every navigator is advised to check: i) is it clear who owns the website? ii) does the website clearly state its purpose? iii) is the information on the website based on sound scientific study? iv) does information on the website make sense? v) does the website weigh evidence and describe the limits of research? vi) is the website filled with “junk science” or conspiracy theories? vii) are the people or groups giving you information online qualified to address the subject? viii) what is the website’s privacy policy? ix) does the website direct you to additional information? x) Social media Also 8 websites are recommended.
  21. Stories from people affected from vaccine-preventable, infectious diseases.
  22. Free classroom resource for teachers, and a chance for students to make a real difference through UNICEF Canada.
  23. This document presents the scientific evidence behind WHO’s recommendations on building and restoring confidence in vaccines and vaccination, both in ongoing work and during crises. The evidence draws on a vast reserve of laboratory research and fieldwork within psychology and communication. It examines how people make decisions about vaccination; why some people are hesitant about vaccination; and the factors that drive a crisis, covering how building trust, listening to and understanding people, building relations, communicating risk and shaping messages to the audiences may mitigate crises. This background document is part of the Vaccination and trust library, which includes a series of support documents with practical guidance for specific situations.
  24. Usability.gov is the leading resource for user experience (UX) best practices and guidelines, serving practitioners and students in the government and private sectors. The site provides overviews of the user-centered design process and various UX disciplines. It also covers the related information on methodology and tools for making digital content more usable and useful. Site Management Content for this site is managed by the Digital Communications Division in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) Office of the Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs. HHS actively collaborates with many federal agencies and other individuals in the public and private sector interested in UX to produce content and share industry trends and ideas.
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