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Found 7 results

  1. A vaccine to prevent COVID-19 is likely to be the most effective way to control the pandemic. Scientists across the world have worked to develop vaccines which have then been rigorously tested for safety and efficacy. Those with a role in delivering/supporting the COVID-19 vaccine programme need to be knowledgeable, confident and competent in order to promote confidence in the vaccination programme and deliver the vaccine safely. The purpose of this pack is to ensure you have all the resources and information you need to hand, acting as a ‘go to guide’ to support you when talking with patients who are eligible for a Covid-19 vaccination but are showing signs of hesitancy. People may be concerned about or refusing the vaccine due to worries, fears, unclear about messages or for many other reasons. It’s important to understand that people will have their point of view and it may take time to talk through their concerns. Using Motivational Interviewing techniques, listening skills and sharing factual information about Covid-19 and the vaccine may help to encourage people and offer reassurance.
  2. The end of the COVID-19 pandemic will depend on our ability to address vaccine hesitancy, one of the top 10 threats to global health, before a vaccine is put on the market. Meeting the Challenge of Vaccination Hesitancy, a report published in June 2020 by the Sabin-Aspen Vaccine Science & Policy Group, lays out actionable steps that leaders across healthcare, research, philanthropy and technology can take to build confidence in vaccines and vaccinations. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, worldwide measles outbreaks in communities with low immunization rates revealed gaps in the herd immunity that once protected us, including the United States’ largest measles outbreak in 20 years in 2019. The troubling trend of declining vaccination uptake is fueled by complacency and loss of confidence in the system that develops, produces, recommends and delivers vaccines. Bold, interdisciplinary, global action is urgently needed to ensure confidence in immunization, which is estimated to save between 2 and 3 million lives every year. Three ‘Big Ideas’ proposed in the report address the primary barriers to vaccine acceptance, provide a framework for progress, and sound a call to action. They are: A new media collaborative to serve as an interface between the vaccination community and social media platforms A research agenda to create ample evidence-based knowledge about the sources of vaccine hesitancy and the best ways to counter it A new narrative to shift the conversation around immunization to one that focuses on achievements and promise and helps build resiliency in the vaccine enterprise This report from the 2019 meeting of the Sabin-Aspen Vaccine Science & Policy Group highlights that although vaccination remains a well-accepted social norm worldwide, a combination of factors—including the spread of misinformation on social media; decreased trust in institutions including government, science and industry; and weaknesses within health systems—has diminished confidence among some populations. Framing the key findings of the report are five original background papers detailing current challenges and opportunities to approach vaccination hesitancy across various disciplines, including social media and online misinformation, social and behavioral science insights and research into the genesis of social movements.
  3. This document presents the scientific evidence behind WHO’s recommendations on building and restoring confidence in vaccines and vaccination, both in ongoing work and during crises. The evidence draws on a vast reserve of laboratory research and fieldwork within psychology and communication. It examines how people make decisions about vaccination; why some people are hesitant about vaccination; and the factors that drive a crisis, covering how building trust, listening to and understanding people, building relations, communicating risk and shaping messages to the audiences may mitigate crises. This background document is part of the Vaccination and trust library, which includes a series of support documents with practical guidance for specific situations.
  4. This page deals with the challenge for many physicians against vaccine hesitancy and refusal among families. Case studies based in real-life scenarios are provided to help physicians to demonstrate effective vaccine safety communication. Trainees are asked a series of questions and provided with immediate feedback for their responses
  5. This is a web page by the American Academy of Pediatrics with guidance for healthcare providers for communication with vaccine hesitant parents . The page includes: Types of parental immunization attitudes Key points to consider Strategies for Talking to Parents Policies and Resources
  6. This section is a brief review of communicate methods to reassure parents about benefits and risks of vaccines. A table with the types of parental immunization attitudes figure, followed by key points to consider, strategies for talking to parents and finally suggested videos demonstrating this model of communication
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