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Found 23 results

  1. Organizations will play an important role in vaccine uptake even if they are not in the healthcare space. Employees and external audiences are increasingly depending on companies to be trusted sources for providing credible information and resources. The Institute for Public Relations (IPR) has published this in-depth guide outlining research, theories, models, levers, and research-driven recommendations to help ensure effective communication strategies for organizations worldwide.
  2. The Ad Council and COVID Collaborative are leading a massive communications effort to educate the American public and build confidence around the COVID-19 vaccines. Guided by the leading minds in science and medicine and fueled by the best talent in the private sector, the COVID-19 Vaccine Education Initiative is designed to reach different audiences, including communities of color who have been disproportionately affected by COVID-19. The following insights are based on extensive qualitative and quantitative research we conducted in December 2020 to ensure our messages are research-based and
  3. The #SCIENCE to SUPPORT #VACCINES IS CLEAR. However, sometimes, The MESSAGE to The LAY COMMUNITY IS NOT. Children and teens enjoy reading #comics: A GATEWAY to HEALTH LITERACY This why we make this mini-series. #VaccinesWork & #VaccinesSaveLives
  4. The Guide presents recommendations for vaccine safety communication with a specific focus on regulatory bodies.
  5. In March 2012, the SAGE Working Group on Vaccine Hesitancy was convened to define the term “vaccine hesitancy”, as well as to map the determinants of vaccine hesitancy and develop tools to measure and address the nature and scale of hesitancy in settings where it is becoming more evident.The definition of vaccine hesitancy and a matrix of determinants guided the development of a survey tool to assess the nature and scale of hesitancy issues. Additionally, vaccine hesitancy questions were piloted in the annual WHO-UNICEF joint reporting form, completed by National Immunization Managers globally
  6. The Royal Society for Public Health (RSPH) is an independent health education charity and the world’s longest-established public health body. The RSPH report, Moving the Needle, looks at the importance of vaccination through childhood, working-age adulthood, and later life, and explores the barriers to uptake at different stages of the life course. The discovery of our ability to immunise people against disease has had an almost unprecedented impact on human health. Though the UK has a world-leading vaccination programme and this s
  7. Many countries and communities are dealing with groups and growing numbers of individuals who are delaying or refusing recommended vaccinations for themselves or their children. This has created a need for immunization programs to find approaches and strategies to address vaccine hesitancy. An important source of useful approaches and strategies is found in the frameworks, practices, and principles used by commercial and social marketers, many of which have been used by immunization programs.This review examines how social and commercial marketing principles and practices can be used to help a
  8. While most people vaccinate according to the recommended schedule, this success is challenged by individuals and groups who delay or refuse vaccines. The aim of this article is to review studies on vaccine hesitancy among healthcare providers (HCPs), and the influences of their own vaccine confidence and vaccination behaviour on their vaccination recommendations to others. The search strategy was developed in Medline and then adapted across several multidisciplinary mainstream databases including Embase Classic & Embase, and PschInfo. All foreign language articles were included
  9. The purpose of this systematic review is to identify, describe and assess the potential effectiveness of strategies to respond to issues of vaccine hesitancy that have been implemented and evaluated across diverse global contexts.
  10. The relations between vaccine hesitancy (VH) and individual socioeconomic status (SES) vary with context and remain poorly understood. We examined associations between parental SES and VH levels and their potential mediation by two attitudinal factors: commitment to making “good” health-related decisions and trust in mainstream medicine. Vaccine refusal and delay are frequent among French parents, especially the more educated. Our results suggest that levels of commitment and trust play a key role in shaping VH. Suitable educational interventions are needed to restore trust in authorities
  11. The SAGE Working Group on Vaccine Hesitancy concluded that vaccine hesitancy refers to delay in acceptance or refusal of vaccination despite availability of vaccination services. Vaccine hesitancy is complex and context specific, varying across time, place and vaccines. It is influenced by factors such as complacency, convenience and confidence. The Working Group retained the term ‘vaccine’ rather than ‘vaccination’ hesitancy,although the latter more correctly implies the broader range of immunization concerns, as vaccine hesitancy is the more commonly used term. While high levels of hesitancy
  12. Based on the concerns about vaccine hesitancy and its impact on vaccine uptake rates and the performance of national immunization programmes, the Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (SAGE) on Immunization Working Group on Vaccine Hesitancy [1], carried out a review, and proposed a set of recommendations directed to the public health community, to WHO and its partners, and to the World Health Organization (WHO) member states. The final recommendations issued by SAGE in October 2014 fall into three categories: (1) those focused on the need to increase the understanding of vaccine hesitancy, its
  13. When faced with vaccine hesitancy, public health authorities are looking for effective strategies to address this issue. In this paper, the findings of 15 published literature reviews or meta-analysis that have examined the effectiveness of different interventions to reduce vaccine hesitancy and/or to enhance vaccine acceptance are presented and discussed. From the literature, there is no strong evidence to recommend any specific intervention to address vaccine hesitancy/refusal. The reviewed studies included interventions with diverse content and approaches that were implemented in different
  14. Vaccine refusal has an impact on public health, and the human pappillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is particularly underutilized. Research suggests that it may be difficult to change vaccine-related attitudes, and there is currently no good evidence to recommend any particular intervention strategy. One reason for vaccine hesitancy is lack of trust that vaccine harms are adequately documented and reported, yet few communication strategies have explicitly attempted to improve this trust. This study tested the possibility that data from the vaccine adverse event reporting system (VAERS) can be used to
  15. This page deals with the challenge for many physicians against vaccine hesitancy and refusal among families. Case studies based in real-life scenarios are provided to help physicians to demonstrate effective vaccine safety communication. Trainees are asked a series of questions and provided with immediate feedback for their responses
  16. Public trust can be improved by learning from past mistakes, by establishing a standing forum for review of new concerns as they arise, and by maintaining a robust vaccine safety system. Developing standard guidelines for reporting causality assessment in case reports would help educate physicians and prevent future unnecessary concerns based on false assumptions of causal relationships.
  17. Vaccine Volume 36, Issue 35, 23 August 2018, Pages 5273-5281 Measuring vaccine hesitancy: Field testing the WHO SAGE Working Group on Vaccine Hesitancy survey tool in Guatemala Author links open overlay panelGretchen J.DomekabSean T.O'LearyacSheanaBullbdMichaelBronsertbcIngrid L.Contreras-RoldaneGuillermo AntonioBolaños VenturafAllisonKempeacEdwin J.Asturiasabg https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2018.07.046Get rights and content Under a Creative Commons license open access Highlights • The Vaccine Hesitancy Survey (VHS) wa
  18. Publication date: 22 October 2018 Source: Vaccine, Volume 36, Issue 44 Author(s): Jessica Kaufman, Rebecca Ryan, Simon Lewin, Xavier Bosch-Capblanch, Claire Glenton, Julie Cliff, Angela Oyo-Ita, Artur Manuel Muloliwa, Afiong Oku, Heather Ames, Gabriel Rada, Yuri Cartier, Sophie Hill Abstract Background Communication interventions for childhood vaccination are promising strategies to address vaccine hesitancy, but current research is limited by the outcomes measured. Most studies measure only vaccination-related outcomes, with minimal consideration of vacc
  19. Publication date: 22 October 2018 Source: Vaccine, Volume 36, Issue 44 Author(s): Angus Thomson, Gaëlle Vallée-Tourangeau, L. Suzanne Suggs https://www.sciencedirect.com/journal/vaccine
  20. This is a web page by the American Academy of Pediatrics with guidance for healthcare providers for communication with vaccine hesitant parents . The page includes: Types of parental immunization attitudes Key points to consider Strategies for Talking to Parents Policies and Resources
  21. For most readers of “Vaccine,” it is a truism that vaccines represent one of the safest and most effective tools available in global efforts to control and prevent infectious diseases. Yet, parents searching the Internet about whether or not it is safe to get themselves or their children vaccinated will find this consensus recast as a controversy, or even a conspiracy. Many of the top internet search results question or dispute the scientific consensus about the safety and effectiveness of some or all vaccine son a number of grounds, from secular to religious to political-philosophical. The ga
  22. Despite relatively high vaccination coverage rates in the European Region, vaccine hesitancy is under-mining individual and community protection from vaccine preventable diseases. At the request of its European Technical Advisory Group of Experts on Immunization (ETAGE), the Vaccine-preventable Dis-eases and Immunization Programme of the WHO Regional Office for Europe (WHO/EURO) developed tools to help countries address hesitancy more effectively. The Guide to Tailoring Immunization Programmes (TIP), an evidence and theory based behavioral insight framework, issued in 2013, provides tools to (
  23. Mitja Vrdelja Alenka Kraigher Dejan Verčič Samo Kropivnik European Journal of Public Health, Volume 28, Issue 5, 1 October 2018, Pages 934–939, Published: 04 July 2018 Abstract Background Vaccination coverage is dropping in several countries, including Slovenia. More and more people hesitate or even reject vaccinations. As the influence of the internet grows, the question becomes how to communicate about vaccination to parents in order to prevent this drop i
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