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Found 4 results

  1. If vaccines work, why do unvaccinated people present a risk to those who have been vaccinated? Find the answer to this as well as ways to keep both vaccinated and unvaccinated people protected.
  2. This is a short video, explaining herd immunity. It has been viewed 100,000 times.
  3. This is a short video, telling the true story of a mother who needs other parents in her community to ensure that their children are vaccinated. The mother is receiving treatment for cancer.
  4. ‘Vaccination is an individual right and a shared responsibility.’ That’s the focus of the 2018 European Immunization Week, organised by the World Health Organization (WHO). Ensuring access to immunisation services is essential to controlling preventable diseases. But why is ‘shared responsibility’ in the spotlight? Central to this idea is the scientific concept of ‘herd immunity’, sometimes called ‘community immunity’. This explains how we can stop the spread of disease by maintaining high levels of immunisation. For example, if 95% of people in a community have two doses of the MMR vaccine, measles outbreaks can be prevented. As some people are too sick or too young to be vaccinated, it is essential that the rest of us play our part in protecting them. To help explain this idea, VaccinesToday collected some of the top YouTube videos on herd immunity.
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