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Smaragda

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  1. ИНФОРМАЦИОННЫЙ БЮЛЛЕТЕНЬ НАБЛЮДАЕМЫЙ УРОВЕНЬ ПОСТВАКЦИНАЛЬНЫХ РЕАКЦИЙ ГРИППОЗНАЯ ВАКЦИНА
  2. HOJA DE INFORMACIÓN SOBRE LAS TASAS OBSERVADAS DE REACCIONES A VACUNAS VACUNA CONTRA EL HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE TIPO B (HIB)
  3. HOJA DE INFORMACIÓN SOBRE LAS TASAS OBSERVADAS DE REACCIONES A VACUNAS VACUNA BACILO DE CALMETTE-GUÉRIN (BCG)
  4. Smaragda

    Ántrax

    HOJA DE INFORMACIÓN SOBRE LAS TASAS OBSERVADAS DE REACCIONES A VACUNAS VACUNA CONTRA EL ÁNTRAX PARA USO EN HUMANOS
  5. FREQUENCE OBSERVEE DES REACTIONS POST-VACCINALES VACCINS A USAGE HUMAIN CONTRE LE CHARBON
  6. INFORMATION SHEET OBSERVED RATE OF VACCINE REACTIONS ANTHRAX VACCINES TO HUMANS
  7. Vaccination is under attack by individuals who occasionally use the legal system to oppose mandatory vaccination laws and in some cases to obtain exemptions for particular children whose parents are opposed to vaccination. During the legal proceedings, as we have witnessed, experts testifying in favor of vaccination may be challenged with references from journals of doubtful quality that oppose vaccination. To provide important references that discuss and disprove claims made against vaccines, the Vaccine Education Center at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia has created a library of references addressing certain safety issues that may be useful as an aid and refresher to clinicians giving expert testimony on the safety of vaccines and to lawyers defending vaccination of children. The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia legal library may be entered through the web address vaccine.chop.edu/safety-references. We would be grateful if you could inform your colleagues about the availability of this resource, which should be of great value for experts testifying for vaccination and for clinicians who need to convince parents about vaccine safety. Stanley A. Plotkin, MD Department of Pediatrics Perelman School of Medicine University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Paul A. Offit, MD Vaccine Education Center at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Dorit Reiss, LLB, PhD University of California Hastings College of the Law
  8. Smaragda

    Immunization Action Coalition

    A fantastic website with lots of information about vaccines, vaccine safety and vaccine communication. Targeted audience includes general public as well as healthcare professionals. Several sections are very interesting and informative.
  9. A monovalent rotavirus vaccine was introduced in the Ethiopian Expanded Program on Immunization from November 2013. We compared impact of rotavirus vaccine introduction on rotavirus associated acute diarrhea hospitalizations and genotypic characteristics of rotavirus strains pre-and post-vaccine introduction. Sentinel surveillance for diarrhea among children <5 years of age was conducted at 3 hospitals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia from 2011 to 2017. Stool specimens were collected from enrolled children and tested using an antigen capture enzyme immunoassay. Rotavirus positive samples (156 from pre- and 141 from post-vaccination periods) were further characterized by rotavirus genotyping methods to identify the predominant G and P types circulating during the surveillance era. Following rotavirus vaccine introduction in Ethiopia, a reduction in rotavirus associated hospitalizations was seen in all age groups with the greatest burden in children <12 months of age. A wide variety of rotavirus strains circulated in the pre- and post-vaccine introduction periods.
  10. Human papilloma virus vaccines are a safe and effective tool for reducing HPV infections that can cause cervical cancer. However, uptake of these vaccines has been suboptimal, with many people holding negative beliefs and misconceptions. Such beliefs have been linked with the experience of unpleasant side effects following medical treatment, and media coverage may heighten such concerns. The present study sought to assess the influence of news coverage (number of news articles per month) on adverse event reporting in response to Gardasil vaccination in New Zealand over a 7.5-year period, and whether the influence of news coverage was mediated by internet search activity (Google search volumes). Multiple linear regression analyses and simple mediation analyses were used, controlling for year and number of vaccinations delivered. News coverage in the previous month, and Google search volumes in the same month, were significant predictors of adverse event reporting, after accounting for vaccination rates and year. Concurrent Google search volumes partially mediated the effect of prior news coverage. The results suggest that some of the adverse events reported were not related to the vaccination itself, but to news coverage and internet search volumes, which may have contributed to public concerns about potentially unpleasant or harmful outcomes. These findings have implications for the importance of psychological and social factors in adverse event reporting, and the role of the news media in disseminating health information.
  11. In November 2017, it was announced that the new dengue vaccine (“Dengvaxia”) had risks for those not previously exposed to dengue. While some countries proceeded with adjusting guidance accordingly, the Philippines reacted with outrage and political turmoil with naming and shaming of government officials involved in purchasing the vaccine, as well as scientists involved in the vaccine trials and assessment. The result was broken public trust around the dengue vaccine as well heightened anxiety around vaccines in general. The Vaccine Confidence ProjectTM measured the impact of this crisis, comparing confidence levels in 2015, before the incident, with levels in 2018. The findings reflect a dramatic drop in vaccine confidence from 93% “strongly agreeing” that vaccines are important in 2015 to 32% in 2018. There was a drop in confidence in those strongly agreeing that vaccines are safe from 82% in 2015 to only 21% in 2018; similarly confidence in the effectiveness of vaccines dropped from 82% in 2015 to only 22%. This article highlights the importance of routinely identifying gaps or breakdowns in public confidence in order to rebuild trust, before a pandemic threat, when societal and political cooperation with be key to an effective response.
  12. Smaragda

    "Why Vaccines Work"

    As more and more parents are choosing not to vaccinate their children or are vaccinating them later, diseases like measles are making a comeback. Are vaccines safe? How do vaccines work? Why do some people claim there is a link between vaccines and autism? This video looks at why are people afraid of something that has saved so many lives, and look at the history and science of vaccines.
  13. Based on the concerns about vaccine hesitancy and its impact on vaccine uptake rates and the performance of national immunization programmes, the Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (SAGE) on Immunization Working Group on Vaccine Hesitancy [1], carried out a review, and proposed a set of recommendations directed to the public health community, to WHO and its partners, and to the World Health Organization (WHO) member states. The final recommendations issued by SAGE in October 2014 fall into three categories: (1) those focused on the need to increase the understanding of vaccine hesitancy, its determinants and the rapidly changing challenges it entails; (2) those focused on dealing with the structures and organizational capacity to decrease hesitancy and increase acceptance of vaccines at the global, national and local levels; (3) and those focused on the sharing of lessons learnt and effective practices from various countries and settings as well as the development, validation and implementation of new tools to address hesitancy.
  14. In March 2012, the SAGE Working Group on Vaccine Hesitancy was convened to define the term “vaccine hesitancy”, as well as to map the determinants of vaccine hesitancy and develop tools to measure and address the nature and scale of hesitancy in settings where it is becoming more evident.The definition of vaccine hesitancy and a matrix of determinants guided the development of a survey tool to assess the nature and scale of hesitancy issues. Additionally, vaccine hesitancy questions were piloted in the annual WHO-UNICEF joint reporting form, completed by National Immunization Managers globally. The objective of characterizing the nature and scale of vaccine hesitancy issues is to better inform the development of appropriate strategies and policies to address the concerns expressed, and to sustain confidence in vaccination.The Working Group developed a matrix of the determinants of vaccine hesitancy informed by a systematic review of peer reviewed and grey literature, and by the expertise of the working group. The matrix mapped the key factors influencing the decision to accept, delay or reject some or all vaccines under three categories: contextual, individual and group, and vaccine-specific. These categories framed the menu of survey questions presented in this paper to help diagnose and address vaccine hesitancy.
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