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  1. Earlier
  2. In episode 4 of our COVID-19 Road to a vaccine series, we spoke with Professor Kanta Subbarao. Professor Subbarao has been the Director of the World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza since 2016, based at The Doherty Institute at the University of Melbourne, Australia. In episode 5 of our COVID-19 Road to a vaccine series, we spoke with Professor Terry Nolan, who is a Redmond Barry Distinguished Professor at the Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity. He heads up VIRGO, the vaccine and immunisation research group, a collaboration between Murdoch Children's Research Institute and the University of Melbourne. VIRGO has the largest and longest standing child and adolescent vaccine population research and clinical trials program in Australia.
  3. The end of the COVID-19 pandemic will depend on our ability to address vaccine hesitancy, one of the top 10 threats to global health, before a vaccine is put on the market. Meeting the Challenge of Vaccination Hesitancy, a report published in June 2020 by the Sabin-Aspen Vaccine Science & Policy Group, lays out actionable steps that leaders across healthcare, research, philanthropy and technology can take to build confidence in vaccines and vaccinations. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, worldwide measles outbreaks in communities with low immunization rates revealed gaps in the herd immunity that once protected us, including the United States’ largest measles outbreak in 20 years in 2019. The troubling trend of declining vaccination uptake is fueled by complacency and loss of confidence in the system that develops, produces, recommends and delivers vaccines. Bold, interdisciplinary, global action is urgently needed to ensure confidence in immunization, which is estimated to save between 2 and 3 million lives every year. Three ‘Big Ideas’ proposed in the report address the primary barriers to vaccine acceptance, provide a framework for progress, and sound a call to action. They are: A new media collaborative to serve as an interface between the vaccination community and social media platforms A research agenda to create ample evidence-based knowledge about the sources of vaccine hesitancy and the best ways to counter it A new narrative to shift the conversation around immunization to one that focuses on achievements and promise and helps build resiliency in the vaccine enterprise This report from the 2019 meeting of the Sabin-Aspen Vaccine Science & Policy Group highlights that although vaccination remains a well-accepted social norm worldwide, a combination of factors—including the spread of misinformation on social media; decreased trust in institutions including government, science and industry; and weaknesses within health systems—has diminished confidence among some populations. Framing the key findings of the report are five original background papers detailing current challenges and opportunities to approach vaccination hesitancy across various disciplines, including social media and online misinformation, social and behavioral science insights and research into the genesis of social movements.
  4. The aim of this document is to encourage and support effective communication of data related to vaccine-preventable diseases, vaccines and immunization. It is written for staff of immunization programmes or related entities to help build their capacities and interest in optimizing data communication to further support achievement of immunization targets and goals.
  5. In Episode 2 of our podcast series 'COVID-19, Road to a Vaccine' we speak with Professor Kathryn Edwards from Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville, Tennessee, about the important topic of vaccine safety when developing a new vaccine, including some of the challenges faced in the COVID19 vaccine development pathway. In Episode 3, Associate Professor Nigel Crawford discusses the development of a COVID-19 vaccine with Professor Andrew Pollard, head of The Oxford Vaccine Group, who is co-leading The Oxford Vaccine Centre’s COVID-19 vaccine trial.
  6. In Episode 1 of our new podcast series, Associate Professor Nigel Crawford, a vaccinologist and consultant paediatrician at the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute (MCRI) & Royal Children’s Hospital (RCH), Melbourne, talks with Stanley Plotkin, Emeritus Professor of Paediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania; who is well known internationally for his role in vaccine development. In this episode they discuss:•Professor Plotkin’s role in the development of the rubella vaccine, still used throughout the world today •His role as the Editor in Chief of the ‘Vaccines’ textbook •His role in the formation of the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness and Innovation (CEPI) and CEPI’s current role in global COVID-19 vaccine development •What can we learn from the H1N1 pandemic in the development of a COVID-19 vaccine? •How developing a vaccine against coronaviruses is critical to the future of civilisation as economies are being destroyed by these viruses •Human challenge models and some of the ethical considerations we need to tackle if these sorts of trials are going to be undertaken to support COVID-19 vaccine development •Success can only be achieved through global collaboration in the pursuit of a COVID-19 vaccine •How the practical aspects of distributing a vaccine on this scale have never been faced before and the importance of thinking outside the box!
  7. As vacinas são poderosas aliadas da saúde, com comprovada capacidade para controlar e eliminar doenças infecciosas que ameaçam a vida. Elas têm sido instrumento fundamental na redução da mortalidade infantil e no aumento da expectativa de vida do brasileiro, ou seja, têm nos ajudado a viver mais e melhor. E não é só isso! No vídeo, a vice-presidente da SBIm, Isabella Ballalai, conta quais foram as maiores conquistas alcançadas graças à vacinação. Assista.Acesse mais vídeos como este em: https://familia.sbim.org.br/videos #VacinaÉProteçãoParaTodos #VacinasFuncionam #VerificadoPorVSN#VaccinesWork #VSNVerified
  8. HPV vaccines protect against cervical cancer. The vaccine is used in more than 80 countries More than 80 million girls and women worldwide have now received these vaccines In some countries, the uptake is greater than 90%. In Japan in 2013, false rumours spread on social media about the safety of HPV vaccines. Some parents opted out of HPV vaccination on behalf of their daughters. Denmark and Ireland have faced the same problem. What’s the worry? Specifically, some have claimed that the vaccine is linked to: - complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) - postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) Why the confusion? CRPS and POTS are real but very rare conditions that can affect teenagers. HPV vaccines are given to teenagers, leading some to wonder whether there is a connection. Are the concerns reasonable? The concerns are understandable but unfounded. There is no causal link between HPV vaccines and the symptoms of CRPS and POTS. How do we know? Independent experts at the European Medicines Agency looked at the rates of these conditions in teenagers who had had the vaccine. They compared this to teenagers who had not had the vaccine. The rates of POTS and CRPS were the same in both groups.
  9. Take the I Boost immunity quiz challenge. Educate yourself and you local community and help int he global effort to vaccinate children throughout the world. For each quiz you do, earn one vaccine for a child in need in support of UNICEF.
  10. A synopsis of the manual for program managers and health professionals to prevent, identify and respond to stress-related responses following immunization
  11. A manual for program managers and health professionals to prevent, identify and respond to stress-related responses following immunization
  12. Explains the properties of aluminum adjuvants in vaccines and how we know they are safe and do not cause neurological damage or autism. Also debunks a commonly cited study used to make false claims about the safety of aluminum adjuvants.
  13. Dr Frederic Bouder explains how the communication on vaccine safety should be conducted.
  14. Dr Anders Hviid, from the University of Oxford demonstrates once again that Measles' vaccine does not cause autism.
  15. Video from Dr Sarah Gilbert (University of Oxford)
  16. "We Can Be the First" is a HPV video created by ImmunizeBC that interviews teens about HPV's connection to cancer. The teens come to understand that getting vaccinated can help their generation "be the first" to eliminate cervical cancer.
  17. In this podcast, Dr Walter Orenstein discusses “Should we vaccinate?”. After the elimination of measles in the USA in 2000, the first six months of 2019 has seen over 1000 cases. Vaccination does not cause autism, but lack of vaccination can result in serious long-term consequences in some infected children.
  18. Why immunizations are important for your child
  19. A look at how the enduring myth of the vaccine-autism link began, the pseudoscience behind it, and a summary of the scientific evidence disproving the link.
  20. Most Common Questions from the National Immunisation Conference 23rd May 2019
  21. Free Vaccine Mobile App: "Vaccines on the Go: What You Should Know" - Vaccine Education Center
  22. Fiche illustrée qui explique la vaccination avec des dessins et des mots simples
  23. Questions and answers on immunization and vaccine safety
  24. Promotional resources for GP practices, nursery settings, primary and secondary schools. Posters: These posters are aimed at parents and carers to remind them to check that their child is up to date with their vaccinations. It features the MMR vaccine and the pre-school booster. They are suitable for all GP practices, schools and nursery settings and are available to order: Primary school poster - order code: STARTPR1, Secondary school poster - order code: STARTSE1, Nursery poster - order code: STARTNU2 Postcards: The postcards are suitable for all GP, school and nursery staff to send out to parents and carers of children as a reminder to prompt them to check that their child is up to date. They are available to order: Primary school postcard - order code: STARTPR2, Secondary school postcard - order code: STARTSE2, Nursery postcard - order code: STARTNU1
  25. THIS RESOURCE COVERS: - What you may hear from parents about their vaccine safety questions and how to effectively address them - Proven communication strategies and tips for having a successful vaccine conversation with parents
  26. Whether you’re a primary care physician, nurse, pharmacist, or other health care professional (HCP), you play a significant role in helping protect your patients against influenza. The best available protection is annual influenza vaccination for all patients ages 6 months and older. Your strong influenza vaccine recommendation is one of the most important factors in patients accepting the vaccine. This page provides tools to prepare your practice to fight flu. The materials will: Equip you to make strong influenza vaccine recommendations Facilitate productive conversations with your patients Improve your influenza vaccination rates
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